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It’s winter here in New Zealand and with that comes the amazing Tamarillo season! Tamarillos support skin health as they contain essential skin nutrients – Vitamin A, C and E. With that in mind we’ve created this divine Bestow Tamarillo Winter Salsa recipe which is a great option for your daily dose of Bestow Beauty Plus Oil.

 

 

TAMARILLO SALSA RECIPE

6 Tamarillos
2 handfuls of fresh coriander
1/2 a red onion, finely sliced
Juice of one lime or lemon
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 tablespoon of Bestow Beauty Plus Oil
Himalayan salt and cracked black pepper

With a sharp knife cut a cross in the end of each tamarillo (not the stalk end the other end). Add the whole tamarillos to a bowl and cover with boiling water. Soak for 10 minutes – this process makes them easy to peel. Remove from the water, let cool so that you can handle them and peel. Chop them into small chunks. Place in a small bowl, add the coriander, onion, lime juice, olive oil and Bestow Beauty Plus Oil. Stir and season to taste with salt and pepper. Plaster on everything that you eat (it’s that good) except maybe muesli.

 

Pretty much everyone knows by now that probiotics are vital for maintaining good gut health.  But did you know that there is a key probiotic source that is readily available but often overlooked?

More on that in minute.

But firstly, what’s the deal with probiotics and gut health?

The research all basically says the same thing: a healthy and balanced gut microbiome is foundational for health and wellbeing.

Balance is the key word here. There is a constant tussle between beneficial and harmful microbes going on in your gut – with both groups trying to claim territory and gain the upper hand.

When the good guys win, your health improves.

Probiotics support a healthy microbiome by seeding beneficial microbes into your gut.  More good microbes in the gut = better gut health.

Common Probiotic Sources

Two valuable sources of probiotics are fermented foods and probiotic powders and supplements.  For the latter, it’s important to choose a probiotic that supplies both beneficial bacteria and fungi to support the total microbiome.  I designed Bestow Gut Love + Powder with that in mind, and I am proud that it features the world-class Biohm probiotic.

But there is another probiotic source that you probably already have in your kitchen.

Organic Fruit and Veggies Provide Living Microbes

Organic fruit and vegetables are a lesser-known but hugely important source of probiotics. Living microbes can be found on the leaves and skins of spray-free fruit and vegetables. These naturally occurring microbes can actually help to establish beneficial bacterial colonies in our bodies.

You might be wondering, “why does the produce need to be organic?”

Choose Organic

Unfortunately, our culture’s obsession with cleanliness and sanitation has seeped into our food production methods. Any fruit and vegetables that are not squeaky clean and perfect are discarded or ignored by consumers. This has led to an overuse of pesticides and other sprays to prevent spoilage, which of course, kill the microbes that live on the surface of the produce.

If our fruit and vegetables are too clean then our gut is robbed of an important source of natural probiotics. Research has shown that beneficial microbes are capable of helping our body rid itself of ailments. In particular they help regulate our immune system, preventing it from the over-reaction that is the cause of many inflammation based diseases, whilst keeping it alert enough to ward off unwelcome invaders. Good gut health supports your internal protective mechanisms.

Keep It Local

Another benefit of these microbes is that they adapt to the environment in which they grow, defending themselves again potential allergens in their surrounds.  For optimal health benefits, you are best to eat organic produce from your local area as these microbes will train your body how to respond appropriately to the allergens in your local area.

Shop at Farmers Markets

An easy way to do this is to source your produce from local organic farmers markets. Eat what you can in its fresh, raw state, only gently washing them to remove obvious dirt.

Grow Your Own Spray-Free Herbs

Another option is to grow your own produce. Fresh herbs are a great way to start.  They don’t take up much room in the garden and can even be grown on a window sill. Home grown herbs are an affordable and tasty source of live probiotics that are can be easily grown in your own environment. I would encourage you to pick up some herbs at your local garden centre and plant your own little organic herb patch at home.

Pesto Perfect

Once you have herbs ready to harvest, celebrate by making this yummy Bestow Pesto below. Enjoy the delicious satisfaction that comes from eating organic herbs that you have grown yourself to support your gut microbiome. Happy days!

BESTOW CORIANDER PESTO

This recipe is from the Bestow Love Your Gut 7-Day Online Programme. You could substitute the Coriander for Basil, Rocket or Italian Parsley if you wish or even a mixture of herbs.

INGREDIENTS

2 cups coriander, stalks and all (around 1 plant from the supermarket)
2 cloves of garlic
1 tablespoon of lemon juice
3 tablespoons of olive oil
1 tablespoon of Bestow Beauty Oil
Himalayan salt to season

METHOD
Place ingredients into a blender and blend until fully combined.

NOTES
Coriander (sometimes known as cilantro) has well-known digestive properties and has a calming and anti-inflammatory affect in the intestinal tract. It also helps to prevent a build up of gas, reducing bloating.

  • March 7, 2019

One-pot savoury meals, bursting with flavour are our favourite type of meals to cook. Our fifth recipe book Bestow Savour is a collection of vegetarian, gluten-free, dairy-free, refined-sugar-free recipes which rescue vegetables from bland side dishes and make them the star of the show. The recipe that follows is one of these and perfect for this time of year as there is nothing better than a steaming bowl of Roasted Cauliflower Goodness Soup flavoured with turmeric, cumin, paprika and sumac and garnished with the thyme-fried mushrooms on a cool winter’s day!

 

Roast the Cauliflower.

 

Saute the onion and garlic and add the spices.

 

Golden and tasty!

 

Add the cauliflower and vegetable stock.

 

Simmer and blend.

 

Serve with thyme-fried mushrooms!

RECIPE:

2 heads of cauliflower, cut into florets
Olive oil
1 small onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1⁄2 teaspoon turmeric, ground
1 teaspoon sumac, ground
2 teaspoon cumin, ground
2 teaspoon paprika, ground
1 litre of vegetable stock
Juice and zest of one lemon
1⁄4 cup of Italian parsley, chopped
Small handful of fresh thyme
1⁄2 cup of button mushrooms, sliced
Himalayan or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 200 degrees celsius.

Arrange the cauliflower florets on a large baking tray lined with baking paper; use two baking trays if you need to. Sprinkle cauliflower with salt and pepper and drizzle generously with olive oil. Roast in oven for 30 minutes, turning over midway through. They should be starting to turn golden brown. Remove from oven. Reserve a cupful of florets for the top of the soup.

Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large frypan. Saute the onion gently until translucent (10-15 minutes). Add the chopped garlic, turmeric, sumac, cumin and paprika. Stir together for a brief few seconds until fragrant.

Now add the roasted cauliflower. Stir to coat cauliflower well with the spices then add vegetable stock. Bring to a simmer on medium-high heat. Cover and cook for five minutes.

Uncover and remove from the heat, cool for 10 minutes. Using a stick blender, blend and liquid until you achieve desired consistency. If the soup is too thick add more stock or water.

Return to a medium heat and stir in the lemon juice.

While the soup is heating through, fry the mushrooms in a small pan in 1 tablespoon of olive oil over a medium- high heat. As they start to brown add some fresh thyme and cracked black pepper. Remove from the heat when they are starting to crisp and turn golden brown. Set aside.

Add the soup to serving bowls, top with mushroom, reserved cauliflower florets, fresh thyme, parsley and lemon zest. Season with salt and pepper.

And recently we were featured in the Bay of Plenty Times with the Cauliflower Goodness Soup being the main recipe 🙂

 

 

 

 

  • June 1, 2017

Add wonderful tandoori spices and flavour to roasted cauliflower. Then team it with a creamy coconut, mint dressing for a delicious vegetarian, dairy free side dish or light meal.

Roast Tandoori Cauliflower Recipe
with Creamy Coconut Mint Dressing

INGREDIENTS
1 medium sized cauliflower, cut into florets
1 red onion, sliced
1 tablespoon of olive oil

Tandoori coating
Zest and juice of one small lemon
2/3 cup of coconut yoghurt (dairy free)
1 teaspoon of cumin seeds
1 teaspoon of ginger powder
1 teaspoon of ground coriander
1 teaspoon of turmeric
½ teaspoon of smoked paprika
½ teaspoon of salt

Yoghurt mint dressing
½ a cup of coconut yoghurt (dairy free)
Juice and zest of one lime
1 tablespoon of mint and parsley, finely chopped (save half for garnish)
½ teaspoon of ground cumin
1 tablespoon of Bestow Beauty Oil
Salt and pepper

Heat your oven to 200 degrees celsius.

Mix all the tandoori coating ingredients together in a small bowl. Place the cauliflower florets and sliced red onion into a large bowl. Add the tandoori coating and mix to coat well.

Place on a baking tray lined with baking paper in the oven. Drizzle with olive oil and roast for 25 to 30 minutes until starting to char on the edges. While your cauliflower and onion is roasting, mix all the dressing ingredients together in a jar and shake.

Remove the cauliflower and onion from the oven and let cool. Drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with parsley and mint.

Can be served warm or cold.

  • February 28, 2017

Dark Leafy Greens – What do they do for us?

  • They are a good source of fibre to encourage a healthy bowel and help reduce the risk of many modern diseases.
  • It’s not only dairy products that supply calcium, leafy green vegetables like kale, cabbage, bok choy and collards also contain high amounts of this important mineral.
  • Leafy greens contain good fats, for example, a serving of kale contains 121 mg of omega 3 fatty acids and 92.4mg of omega 6 fatty acids. They also have anti-inflammatory compounds which reduce inflammation though the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants they contain.

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Chard parcels with quinoa

5 chard or silverbeet leaves and stalks
2 cups of quinoa
2 tablespoons of olive oil
1 onion, chopped finely
2 garlic cloves, chopped finely
4 medium, button mushrooms, chopped
½ a lemon, juiced
3 tomatoes, chopped
½ cup of Italian parsley, chopped
1 tablespoon of fresh thyme, chopped
Salt and pepper

Cook the quinoa according to packet instructions. Chop the stalks off the chard leaves and then chop the stalks finely. Panfry the onion, garlic and chard stalks in olive oil until the onion is soft. Add the mushrooms and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and herbs, mix and heat gently for a few minutes. Add the quinoa, stir, season to taste.

Bring a deep frypan with an inch of salted water in it to the boil. Place the chard leaves in the pan, put the lid on and simmer over a medium heat for one-two minutes. Remove the leaves from the pan ready for the filling and cool. The leaves should still be a lovely bright green with the added advantage of being easier to manage.

Place a large tablespoon of the quinoa filling on the leaf, in the center but close to the stalk end. Fold the bottom end and the sides of the leaf in and roll up.

Serve as a vegetarian snack or lunch dish or serve as the vegetable portion of your evening meal. You could also add or exchange other ingredients for the filling such as nuts, raisins, rice, millet, beans, peas, chickpeas, tofu etc.

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  • September 24, 2014

Amaranth is a wonderfully nutritious gluten free grain option. It is a good source of protein, minerals and fibre and has a lower carbohydrate level. Makes 30-35 crackers.

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AMARANTH CRACKERS RECIPE

2 cups amaranth flour

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon honey (optional)

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sunflower seeds

1 tablespoon flax seeds

2 teaspoons of rosemary, finely chopped

1/3 cup water

Heat oven to 175°C.

In a processor add amaranth flour, baking powder, salt, honey, olive oil, seeds, rosemary and blend. Slowly add the water until a dough forms without it being sticky.

Roll out on baking paper to a 2-3mm thickness. Cut shapes with a cookie cutter. Prick each cracker a couple of times with a fork and bake for 15 – 20 mins until golden brown. Allow to cool and store in an airtight container.

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ROAST CAULIFLOWER HUMMUS RECIPE

1/2 head of cauliflower cut into florets

1 tablespoon of olive oil
1/3 cup tahini

2 cloves garlic
Juice of 1 lemon

1/2 – 1 teaspoon of cumin

Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees celsius. Brush the cauliflower florets with the olive oil. Place on a baking tray and roast for 30 minutes until the cauliflower is golden brown on the edges.

Add the roast cauliflower to a processor with the tahini, garlic, lemon and cumin. Process till smooth, season with salt and pepper to taste.

Nutritional notes:
If you compare Amaranth to white rice you can see the amazing benefits it offers our health.

Quantity = 1 cup
Amaranth
Protein – 28.1gm
Magnesium – 519mg
Iron – 15mg
Fibre – 18gm
Carbohydrate – 129gm

White Rice
Protein – 13.1gm
Magnesium – 46mg
Iron – 1.5mg
Fibre – 2.4gm
Carbohydrate – 148gm

The proteins amaranth contain are more digestible than many proteins and are a good source of the amino acid lysine which other grains are short of. Lysine helps prevent you getting cold sores so ideal if you are a sufferer.

Are your memories of cauliflower the boiled to oblivion tasteless ones? If so you need to try roasting your cauliflower! Wow, such a difference, roasting turns this vegetable into a gorgeous sweet, tasty, flavoursome one.

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RECIPE
1 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, quartered
1 medium size cauliflower – florets
4 garlic cloves
, peeled
4-6 cups vegetable stock (low salt)
juice of 1 lemon
1 tsp cumin powder
1 tsp curry powder
1 tablespoon parsley, finely chopped
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees celsius. Shake the cauliflower florets, onion and garlic cloves in a plastic bag with the olive oil. Place all on a baking tray and roast for 30 minutes until the cauliflower is golden brown on the edges.

Remove from the oven, add to a food processor with all the other ingredients and process until smooth. Add more stock if you like a thinner soup.

Pour into a saucepan, heat for 10 minutes over a medium heat and serve.

Nourishing notes: Cauliflower is a great source of vitamin b5, an important vitamin for collagen formation and necessary for your skin to have a healthy oil production. Acne sufferers have often been found to have low blood serum levels of vitamin B5 making them more prone to oil droplets forming in the oil glands of the skin so it is particularly important for them to eat good dietary sources of B5.

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  • August 13, 2014

Have you ever tried making your own falafels? To be honest I’ve always thought they resided in the land of the bland – this was my first attempt. Amazingly they are a taste sensation and I can imagine all sorts of ingredient options so I will be making them alot more! The traditional way to cook them would be to fry them in oil, this version is much healthier and tastes just as good.

Falafels are made from chickpeas, which are full of fibre, both soluble (draws out toxins and lowers cholesterol) and insoluble (encourages elimination). They have a low GI and support energy production in our cells making them ideal for weight loss.

Chickpeas are also wonderful for women especially from a hormonal perspective. The manganese they contain can help the symptoms of PMS but if you are postmenopausal they contain helpful phytochemicals called saponins. These act as antioxidants and can lower the risk of breast cancer, osteoporosis and minimise hot flushes.

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For the falafels:


1 can of chickpeas, drained
2 cloves garlic
1 small onion, roughly chopped
½ cup parsley
1 tablespoon gluten free flour eg. Amaranth, buckwheat, chickpea
1 teaspoons sea salt
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
Fresh cracked black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons of olive oil
100g of pistachios

Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius.

Place all of the ingredients in a food processor and blend for a minute or two – you want the mixture to be manageable but still a little chunky.

With wet hands, roll the mixture into balls and place on a lined baking tray. Bake in the oven, turning every ten minutes, until golden brown – 25 to 30 minutes.

For the tomato salsa:
3 large tomatoes, diced
½ red onion, finely chopped
A good handful of Italian parsley, chopped
Juice of one lemon
Salt and pepper
Mix all together, season to taste.

You could try other fresh herbs in your falafel and salsa mix such as mint, coriander, basil, oregano or a mixture of herbs.

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  • August 1, 2014

snHi there, it’s Sheryl from the huia tree, I’m guest blogging today for Janine of Bestow Beauty. Janine and I work together to bring you recipes and the Bestow Within natural food journals. My journey towards better health and lifestyle started three years ago when I was diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, it knocked the stuffing out of me! Here I was early forties and thinking I could box along at a frantic pace for years to come, surely it wasn’t over yet?

Thankfully it wasn’t, I have learnt more in three years about myself and good health than I have learnt in my 40+ years prior.

I have always loved creating meals, it’s my downtime or de-stress time. I guess that means I get to de-stress alot these days 🙂

I am happiest creating vibrant food that not is not only healthy but of course also looks great when photographed. As I am also a mother of three and work full time, I try to keep it real – recipes that are easy to create and photographs that tell it like it is. Sometimes that doesn’t happen and there are a few disasters – still edible though.

So together with all of that and Janine’s incredible nutritional, wellness and skincare knowledge I think we make a pretty good team! So on that note, this week’s recipe seems fitting – The goddess bowl, full of healing goodness and vibrancy.

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Makes two bowls

Gorgeous green dressing:
1 avocado
1/2 cup spinach leaves
1/2 basil leaves
Juice of one lemon
1 tablespoon of Bestow Beauty Oil
1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste

Blend all together with a stick blender, sweeten a little to taste (optional) with honey, maple, agave syrup or a couple of drops of stevia.

Goddess bowl ingredients:
1/2 buttercup pumpkin
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 teaspoon of cumin powder
1 teaspoon of fennel seeds
1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon
1 cup of black rice, cooked according to packet directions
1 cup of spinach leaves
1 cup of rocket
1/2 cup of fresh sprouts
1/4 red cabbage, shredded
2 tomatoes, cut in wedges
1/2 cup of pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds (toasted if preferred)
Microgreens (optional)
Salt and pepper

Method:
Preheat oven to 180 degrees celsius.
Cut your pumpkin into wedges and remove seeds, pulp and skin. Chop into cubes, toss with the olive oil, cumin, cinnamon, fennel and season with salt and pepper. Place in a baking dish lined with baking paper and bake until soft (15 to 20 mins). While that is cooking make up your two goddess bowls with all the other ingredients. Add the pumpkin when it is cooked, scatter with microgreens (optional), serve with your gorgeous green dressing.

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Where possible we choose organic ingredients, these lovely ones above are from Wild Earth Organics in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty.

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Nourishing Notes from Janine:
The Bestow Goddess Bowls are so full of ‘health protecting’ vegetables that it’s hard to know where to start. They are just SO good for you and your skin that I have decided to focus on the avocados, the hero ingredient found in the dressing.

Avocados are not only rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated fat, they are also a great source of both insoluble and soluble fibre, keeping you regular and ensuring your skin remains fresh and clear.

Avocados are a great source of antioxidant carotenoids like beta carotene, zeaxathin and lutein as well as vitamin E. These compounds soak up free radicals before they have time to harm your cells and keep you protected against environmental damage that leads to fine lines and wrinkles.

Many people are surprised to learn that avocado’s contain good levels of vitamin C too. Vitamin C is another important antioxidant that helps your skin make collagen, your anti-wrinkle fibre.

Lastly, avocados contain Omega 9 and monounsaturated oils (oleic acid) to help soften and moisturise your skin from the inside.

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You will see more of this style of eating in the next BESTOW WITHIN journal coming out in early August! With the right ingredients on hand you can have a fresh, healthy meal in no time at all. Janine and I will show you how 🙂

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With Bestow oil and ginger dressing

A handful of each of the following greens:
Baby spinach
Watercress
Bok choy, sliced
Silver beet
Savoy cabbage, shredded

Wilt your greens in a saucepan with a little water by bringing to the boil.

Dressing:
50mls Bestow Beauty Oil
10mls sesame oil
5gms crushed ginger
10mls soy sauce
Juice of half a lime
10gms sesame seeds
Salt
Pepper

Combine together all dressing ingredients, season and mix through warm wilted greens. Please note to watch the amount of salt used as soy sauce is slightly salty.

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